Snares, deadfalls, and other traps of the northern Algonquians and northern Athapaskans

by Cooper, John M.

Publisher: AMS Press in New York

Written in English
Cover of: Snares, deadfalls, and other traps of the northern Algonquians and northern Athapaskans | Cooper, John M.
Published: Pages: 144 Downloads: 899
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Subjects:

  • Algonquian Indians -- Trapping.,
  • Athapascan Indians -- Trapping.

Edition Notes

Statementby John M. Cooper.
SeriesAnthropological series (Catholic University of America) ;, no. 5.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsE99.A35 C63 1978
The Physical Object
Pagination144 p., [3] leaves of plates :
Number of Pages144
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4899879M
ISBN 100404155162
LC Control Number76043683

For hunting larger animals they used bows and arrows and lances, and for smaller animals they used traps, snares, and deadfalls. For fishing, they used hooks, weirs, leisters, and nets, all of which they made themselves from forest material. Cooking was done in . Northern Bushcraft. In my opinion, the most valuable book on bushcraft. Chapters on knife, axe, fire, shelter, saw, and bits on appropriate plants and animals. Kochanski is the grand old man of bushcraft. If you buy just one book, this would have to be it. Kreps, E. Camp and Trail Methods. Columbus, Ohio: A.R. Harding Publisher. Kreps, E. Algonquin, North American Indian tribe of closely related Algonquian-speaking bands originally living in the dense forest regions of the valley of the Ottawa River and its tributaries in present-day Quebec and Ontario, Canada. The tribe should be differentiated from the Algonquian language family. Principal hunting methods reported include deadfalls, snares, nets, bows and arrows, spears and clubs [, , , ]. Deadfalls were comprised of baited tree logs. When the beaver approached, a log fell on the animal, killing it. This method was mostly used during warm months when there was little snow.

Algonquin Legends, Myths, and Stories (Algonkin) This is our index of Algonquin folktales and traditional stories that can be read online. We have organized our Native American legends section by tribe to make them easier to locate; however, variants on the same legend are often told by American Indians from different tribes, especially if those tribes are kinfolk or neighbors to each other. By , the _____ had pushed the Algonquians into the _____ part of NY. Manhattan Island, Staten Island and Long Island. The Algonquians lived ON. Hudson River Other men made traps, fishing nets, or other kinds of tools. Native American Woman. Raised children; planted, cared for, and picked crops. scarce. hard to find. The Algonquian are one of the most populous and widespread North American native language groups. Today, thousands of individuals identify with various Algonquian peoples. Historically, the peoples were prominent along the Atlantic Coast and into the interior along the Saint Lawrence River and around the Great grouping consists of the peoples who speak Algonquian languages. One of the most populous and widespread Native American groups, Algonquian tribes consist of peoples that speak Algonquian languages and historically shared cultural similarities. There are hundreds of original tribes that spoke several related dialects of the language group. Historically, they lived across eastern North America from the Atlantic Ocean to the Rocky Mountains and from northern.

In other words, there is plenty of room for other origins (including transoceanic) -- research is still in its infancy in this area. One interesting, recent example with mitochondrial DNA is the work done by Douglass C. Wallace at Emory University, which led him to conclude that "prehistoric, intrepid mariners" came "out of Southeast Asia. Other techniques cited include spring traps used by Coast Salish [], rope nooses, which Lillooet set up on bear trails [] and babiche nets used by Northern Athapaskan [2]. Southern Tutchone and Tagish sometimes killed bear in close combat with heavy clubs made of moose or caribou antler []; Chilcotin also used clubs []. Fishes such as whitefish, suckers, and pike were obtained from the Arctic watercourse, while the salmons were acquired from the Pacific. Their hunting implements comprised bows and various forms of arrows, and which were aided by an assortment of resourceful traps, deadfalls, and snares especially in sending the caribou to the drift fence. Algonquian is a frequently misused word, often used by persons who assume they are identifying a specific tribe of Native Americans as being the Algonquian Indians.

Snares, deadfalls, and other traps of the northern Algonquians and northern Athapaskans by Cooper, John M. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Snares Deadfalls and Other Traps of the Northern Algonquians and Northern Athapaskans [Cooper, John M.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Snares Deadfalls and Other Traps of the Northern Algonquians and Northern AthapaskansAuthor: John M.

Cooper. Get this from a library. Snares, deadfalls, and other traps of the northern Algonquians and northern Athapaskans. [John M Cooper]. Snares, deadfalls, and other traps of the northern Algonquians and northern Athapaskans.

Washington, D.C., The Catholic University of America, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: John M Cooper.

Snares, Deadfalls, and Other Traps of the Northern Algonquians and Northern Athapaskans by John M Cooper,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.

Snares, Deadfalls, and Other Traps of the Northern Algonquians and Northern Athapaskans Volume 5 of Anthropological series // The Catholic University of America Issue 5 of Anthropological series Issue 5 of Catholic University of America Anthropological Series Volume 5 of Communal Societies in America: Author: John M.

Cooper: Edition: reprint. Snares, deadfalls, and other traps of the northern Algonquians and northern Athapaskans by Cooper, John M.,AMS Press edition, in English - 1st AMS : Snares, deadfalls, and other traps of the northern Algonquians and northern Athapaskans. Author: Cooper, John M.

(John Montgomery), Note: Washington Catholic University of America, Link: page images at HathiTrust: No stable link: This is an uncurated book entry from our extended bookshelves, readable online now but without a.

Snares, deadfalls, and other traps of the northern Algonquians and northern Athapaskans. articles+ journal articles & other e-resources; Snares, deadfalls, and other traps of the northern Algonquians and northern Athapaskans.

Responsibility by John M. Cooper. Imprint Washington, D.C., The Catholic University of America, Physical description. Deadfalls And Snares A Book Of Instruction For Trappers About These And Other Home Made Traps Snares Deadfalls And Other Traps Of The Northern Algonquians And Northern Athapaskans.

Author by: John Wolfer, Trapping the Canada Lynx, Rabbit and Lynx Snaring, Tricks in Beaver Trapping, Illustrated Snaring Methods, Live Traps, Snares and. Snares, deadfalls, and other traps of the northern Algonquians and northern Athapaskans.

By John M. (John Montgomery) Cooper. Abstract. Mode of access: Internet Topics: Indians of North America, Athapascan Indians., Algonquian Indians.

Snares, deadfalls, and other traps of the northern Algonquians and northern Athapaskans. (Washington Catholic University of America, ), by John M. Cooper (page images at HathiTrust) Villages of the Algonquian, Siouan, and Caddoan Tribes West of the Mississippi, by David I.

Bushnell (Gutenberg ebook). NORTH AMERICA AND HAITI: Snares, Deadfalls, and Other Traps of the Northern Algonquians and Norlhern Athapaskans, JOHN M.

COOPER. Frank G. Speck. University of Pennsylvania. Search for more papers by this author. Frank G. Speck.

University of Pennsylvania. – Cooper, John Montgomery. Snares, Deadfalls And Other Traps Of The Northern Algonquians And Northern Athapaskans. Washington DC: Catholic University Of America, Pages I’m looking forward to a great week.

Snares Deadfalls and Other Traps of the Northern Algonquians and Northern Athapaskans: ISBN () Hardcover, Ams Pr Inc, Status of the sandhill crane in British Columbia (Wildlife bulletin). Snares, deadfalls, and other traps of the northern Algonquians and northern Athapaskans.

committee reports and book reviews). Read more. Snares, deadfalls, and other traps of the northern Algonquians and northern Athapaskans. no Cite this Record. Snares, deadfall and other traps of the Northern Algonquians and Northern Athapaskans.

J M Cooper. The Catholic University of America Anthropological Series. Snares Deadfalls and Other Traps of the Northern Algonquians and Northern Athapaskans: Cooper, John M.: Books - or: John M.

Cooper. Snares, deadfalls and other traps of the northern Algonquians and northern ic University of America Anthropological Series, No. Cooper, J. Is the Algonkian family hunting ground system pre-Columbian?American Anthropologist 66– Google Scholar.

Book Reviews North America and Haiti Snares, Deadfalls, and Other Traps of the Northern Algonquians and Northern Athapaskans by John M. Cooper Snares, Deadfalls, and Other Traps of the Northern Algonquians and Northern Athapaskans by John M.

Cooper (pp. Mason, Otis Tufton. Traps of the Amerind - A Study in Psychology and Invention. American Anthropologist Vol Nelson, Richard K. Hunters of the Northern Forest. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, Nelson, Richard K. Hunters of the Northern Ice. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, Nelson, Richard K.

Make Prayers to. Snares, Deadfalls, and Other Traps of the Northern Algonquians and Northern Athapaskans. Catholic University of America Anthropological Series 2.

Washington. The Athapaskans were nomadic or seminomadic hunters and gatherers, relying on fish and caribou as staples. They fished for salmon with dip nets and basket-shaped traps. They also caught trout, whitefish, and pike, using various fishing methods. They hunted some mammals with bows and arrows and snares.

Joseph Nicolar’s The Life and Traditions of the Red Man tells the story of his people from the first moments of creation to the earliest arrivals and eventual settlement of Europeans. Self-published by Nicolar inthis is one of the few sustained narratives in English composed by a member of an Eastern Algonquian-speaking people during the nineteenth century.

Snares, Deadfalls, and Other Traps of the Northern Algonquians and Northern Athapaskans (Catholic University of America Anthropological Series #5; ), by.

The Northern Algonquians. II(2A2) - Traps -- a. Miscellaneous notes: Legacy Identifier: ASSOCIATED NAMES creator: Speck, Frank G. (Frank Gouldsmith), CONTENT DESCRIPTION Abstract: Review of John M. Cooper's "Snares, deadfalls, and other traps of Northern Algonquians and Northern Athapaskans." Language: English language (eng) Subject (lcsh) Algonquian Indians.

Snares, Deadfalls, and Other Traps of the Northern Algonquians and Northern Athapaskans, JOHN M. COOPER. (Anthropological Series No. 5, pp. 88 figs. 6 pls. Washington: Catholic University of America, ) Dr Cooper's recent monograph, like all those which he has produced, bears.

Hunter-gatherer Igneous Toolstone Procurement in Northern Arizona: A Geochemical Study of Projectile Points and Raw Material Sources. KIVA, Vol. 80, Issue. 2, p.

Snares, Deadfalls, and Other Traps of the Northern Algonquians and Northern Athapaskans. Anthropological Series No. Catholic University of America. Snares, Deadfalls, and Other Traps of the Northern Algonquians and Northern Athapaskans. Washington: Catholic University, Gibson, W.

Hamilton. Camp Life In The Woods and the Tricks of Trapping and T rap Making. New York: Harper and Brothers Publishers, * Gilsvik, Bob. The Complete Book of Trapping. Columbus, Ohio: g.Snares, Deadfalls, and Other Traps of the Northern Algonquians and Norlhern Athapaskans, JOHN M. COOPER. (Anthropological Series No.

5, pp. 88 figs. 6 pls. Washington: Catholic University of America, ) Dr Cooper’s recent monograph, like all those which he has produced, bears.The following history of the varied cultural adaptations made by the Indians of northern Ontario and adjacent Manitoba from to is based primarily on data relating to the Northern Ojibwa.

Since the arrival of Europeans (initially traders) within the central subarctic during the 17th century, the Northern Ojibwa have been pressured to.